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All about child abuse (kids – start here)

Nobody should be hitting you, touching you in the wrong places, or making you feel bad. Adults know better than to do that. If the grown up does it anyway then they have a problem that needs to be fixed before they hurt you any more or hurt somebody else. It’s a bad place to be but there are things you can do to fix it. Here is a general overview of the child abuse problem.

Law prohibiting sex offenders from using online services ruled unconstitutional

An Indiana law barring sex offenders from joining social and online networks like Facebook, Twitter and various chat rooms was ruled unconstitutional by a federal appellate court Wednesday. Judges with the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago said that the law, passed in 2008, violates the First Amendment in that it is too broad a ban.

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Teaching a Child the Difference Between Good Touches and Bad Touches

Good touch, bad touch (GTBT) is gradually learnt through a child’s day to day activities but we can accelerate this learnt behavior by making an effort to teach children the difference between good touch and bad touch at an early age. We live in a society where touching is common but people tend to overreact at times. In addition, threats or secrets go hand in hand with bad touches which further confuses the child. Parents must take the time to explain to their children what good touch and bad touch is and what danger signals to look for.

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Child Abuse Therapy – Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavior Therapy (TF-CBT)

One of the most effective methods of therapy is Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavior Therapy or TF-CBT (TFCBT). Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavior Theory is based on the theory that traumatic events produce information that is hard for the victim to categorize, process, and fit into their existing scheme. When a child cannot truly comprehend a traumatic event, the strong emotions that resulted from the traumatic event are left unprocessed. When the child attempts to process the information, they may either distort the facts to fit within the realm of what they already know or understand, or they may alter their beliefs to fit the unprocessed information into their existing scheme. Either is bad. It leads to guilt, shame, self-blame, and a host of other problems. To counter this, the child must be taught how to deal with the confusing emotions in order to correct maladaptive beliefs.

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Child Abuse Disclosure

One of the most frustrating and puzzling aspects of the child abuse epidemic is the child’s tendency to accept the abuse and not tell anyone. Nearly 75% of abused children do not disclose their abuse within the first year and 20% wait five or more years before telling anyone. This is all the more frustrating when you consider that non-disclosure allows the abuser to continue his acts unabated. The reasons for non-disclosure, the ramifications the abuser experiences afterwards, and the reasons why disclosure is so critically important are varied.